Strategic Alliances

Strategic Alliances are important.  I recently had lunch with someone who has long been an important business contact, and whom I consider a proponent and advocate of mine.  I don’t often get to see her, sometimes years go by with only the occasional email or phone call between our in-person conversations.  In those rare moments across the years when our paths have intersected, I quickly feel an easy connection and there is often more to talk about than the time we have allotted for our meeting.

While I am clear that she has influence and connections that are advantageous and make her a valuable alliance, I value the trusting relationship we have built even more.  It has given me the opportunity to get to know her and I have learned to admire and respect her personal vision and values.  I want her to be wildly successful, as much as I want to be wildly successful.  I believe in her purpose and what she wants to accomplish.  I think she would agree that we share a common stake: building meaning, connection, and purpose in organizations.  If one of us wins, we both win, we all win.

I look for ways to help her win.

I was pondering if I would go so far as to say we have a strategic alliance.  A common definition of the term “strategic alliance” is a formal or informal coming together toward a common objective.  The basic premise in a business context is to maximize collective opportunity while minimizing risk.

As I recently contemplated this relationship, I realized we are like-minded in many respects, but with no agreement to leverage our purpose or life work.  I don’t know if our alliance fits the technical definition, but what I do know is that I am deeply grateful for business relationships like this one.

I have been blessed in my career to know individuals who want to make meaningful differences in the lives of others.  Having business relationships with those who support and encourage the work we do at Xponents is a strategic advantage for which I am deeply grateful.

Thank you for being our customers, advocates, alliances, and proponents of the work we do to develop authentic trust, foster connected conversations, and expand creativity and innovation in the workplace.  We will continue to seek out opportunities to leverage the unique talent and potential that exists through collaboration and co-activity.

If you like this blog, I think you will like my book The Cycle of Transformation. Available now!
Deb Siverson is a seasoned executive coach, certified as a PCC through the International Coach Federation. If you want to schedule time to discuss how you or your organization can increase engagement by having a different conversation at work, contact us now.